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  • #31
    Federals new HST short barrel is very nice. the boolits sit flush with case mouth, minimizing velocity changes based on angle changes of ammo, also have a very wide JHP cavity.
    PLAY THE TRUMP CARD IN 2016!!!

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Chuck R. View Post
      Agreed.

      I tagged both of them. Honestly I don't have the time to waste on either.
      It won't last, you'll miss me too much
      "I suppose it's tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail...." ~Abraham Maslow~

      "Skill makes you harder to kill" ~ Unknown

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      • #33
        Some people have a serious aversion to anything outside of their echo chamber. It's probably a little bit like partisan politics. They just don't want to hear anything that doesn't come put of the mouth unless they have the correct identifying letter next to their name. It's probably the #1 enemy of growth. Why else would gunsite still have such a cult following?

        We know that same group hates questions. They absolutely refuse to answer them. They hide behind the ignore button.
        Failure is an opportunity to learn.

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        • #34
          ricco, does hydrostatic shock play a role in cartridge effectiveness? I'd think that the more tissue disrupted, the more likely and faster the target goes down. Please note that I'm not just referring to blood loss, but such things as tissue and organ damage.
          Taceant colloquia. Effugiat risus. Hic locus est ubi mors gaudet succurrere vitae.
          The Pale Horse available on Amazon for your digital reader.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by gerhard1 View Post
            ricco, does hydrostatic shock play a role in cartridge effectiveness? I'd think that the more tissue disrupted, the more likely and faster the target goes down. Please note that I'm not just referring to blood loss, but such things as tissue and organ damage.
            As I understand it velocity is key

            A powerful Hydrostatic Shock is supposed to scramble the messages transmitted to and from the brain with tissue damage being secondary

            Typically, handgun rounds do not produce the velocity necessary to interrupt nerve impulses

            All bullets produce Hydrostatic Shock, how much the shock or ripple effect impacts the nerves and scramble the messages to and from the brain is dependent on the power of that ripple

            How fast incapacitation would occur from organ damage would depend on the organ, such as an injured liver would likely cause more rapid incapacitation than an a injured spleen


            Last edited by ricco; 02-12-2019, 18:33.
            "I suppose it's tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail...." ~Abraham Maslow~

            "Skill makes you harder to kill" ~ Unknown

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            • #36
              Originally posted by gerhard1 View Post
              ricco, does hydrostatic shock play a role in cartridge effectiveness? I'd think that the more tissue disrupted, the more likely and faster the target goes down. Please note that I'm not just referring to blood loss, but such things as tissue and organ damage.
              gerhard,

              I posted this before, but there's been at least a couple studies done that suggest some "hydro-static" shock does occur at at least the realm of magnum handgun velocities. This one study for instance set the parameters at 500 ft pounds and 12" of penetration, which is pretty much what the .357 125 load delivers.

              Energy Transfer Required for Remote Neural Effects Our own research (Courtney and Courtney) supports the conclusion that handgun levels of energy transfer can produce pressure waves leading to incapacitation and injury.[29][30][26][31][32] The work of Suneson et al. also suggests that remote neural effects can occur with levels of energy transfer possible with handguns (roughly 500 ftlbs/700 joules).
              Even though Wang et al. document remote neural damage for low levels of energy transfer, these levels of neural damage are probably too small to contribute to rapid incapacitation. Courtney and Courtney suggest that remote neural effects only begin to make significant contributions to rapid incapacitation for ballistic pressure wave levels above 500 PSI (corresponds to transferring roughly 300 ft-lbs in 12 inches of penetration) and become easily observable above 1000 PSI (corresponds to transferring roughly 600 ft-lbs in 1 foot of penetration).[29] Incapacitating effects in this range of energy transfer are consistent with observations of remote spinal injuries,[15] observations of suppressed EEGs and breathing interruptions in pigs,[27][33] and with observations of incapacitating effects of ballistic pressure waves without a wound channel.[34]
              https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/0803/0803.3051.pdf

              I wouldn't count on it, but there does seem to be some evidence that it occurs to some extent with handguns. Rifles & carbines I have no doubt having dressed out a chitload of big game animals with "gooey" internals, blood shot meat etc.
              The Lion Does Not Turn Around When the Small Dog Barks

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