Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Involuntary Hand Clenches Leading to Accidental Discharge

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Involuntary Hand Clenches Leading to Accidental Discharge

    For the CCW's who limit themselves to REACTIVE self defense this article is of limited value, Postural Imbalance being a possibility

    For everyone else it's worth a read

    So what causes these involuntary hand clenches?

    The three most commonly identified causes of involuntary hand clenching have been extensively studied. They are as follows:



    1) Postural Imbalance. When the shooter loses balance or trips, his hands will clench.

    2) Startle Effect. When the shooter is under stress and surprised, there will often be a hand clench.

    3) Interlimb Interaction. Under stress, when the non gun hand closes violently, the gun hand will clench, spontaneously duplicating the actions of the non-gun hand.


    https://www.activeresponsetraining.n...vlU5ATKSurSoRk

    Last edited by ricco; 03-12-2019, 20:51.
    "I suppose it's tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail...." ~Abraham Maslow~

    "Skill makes you harder to kill" ~ Unknown

  • #2
    This is very important info.

    Finger out of and above the trigger guard. Why? Well that's the important part.

    That booger off the bang switch stuff is lazy. Students deserve better. They deserve an actual explanation why. If your instructor spends more time explaining sight alignment and sight picture there's something wrong.

    This information was part of a 45 min. to 1 hour lesson in a 4 to 5 hour introduction class for us. In the 16 hr. version it was probably closer to 1.5 hours in length. Sight alignment and sight picture was probably all of a few minutes. Priorities.

    When we have thing in our hand(s) and we slip, trip or fall we are likely to clench to secure what's in our hand(s). If we fall while traversing stairs we're likely to reach out to the wall and/or grap for the railing. If we slip while climbing up or down a ladder we're likely to experience the clench response as well.

    If surprised as stated in the op we're likely to experience the clench response as well. Sometimes even if we don't have something in pur hands. Speaking about hands, our hands are likely to move in-line with the perceived threat. Both can happen simultaneously.

    Sympathetic movements are a real thing as well. Anyone who's used hand tools knows this.
    Failure is an opportunity to learn.

    Comment


    • #3
      [QUOTE=ricco


      1) Postural Imbalance. When the shooter loses balance or trips, his hands will clench.



      [/QUOTE]

      Yet every day people break their wrists because they open their hands up and try to break their fall.

      I bet a lot of people who ND lie about the cause.
      Originally posted by kscardsfan
      Grain of salt hell, I'm taking it with a salt block from the feed store. Thats a big bunch of crap there.




      QUOTE=mjkeat;n1101496]****ing stupid.[/QUOTE]

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Not so big Tom View Post

        Yet every day people break their wrists because they open their hands up and try to break their fall.

        I bet a lot of people who ND lie about the cause.
        What you're talking about falls under the hands moving in line with the threat. When we have something in our hand or in the example of climbing a ladder the hands are likely to clench. Wouldn't it be silly for our hands to move toward the threat, the ground, after missing a rung or ? while climbing a ladder? Absolutely. The thing that increases the probability of surviving that instance wpuld be to grab for and or clench. One of the reasons for the 3" Points Of Contact" thing.

        If I'm walking and talking/texting on my phone the hand holding the phone may clench while the free hand moves toward the ground. Wouldn't it make more sense to tuck the chin to minimize the probability of hitting the head on the ground and avoiding extending the arms and hands to brace for the fall risking broken bones? I don't know. Sounds good.

        As I and many others have stated, these natural reactions are likely to happen but may not.
        Last edited by mjkeat; 03-19-2019, 11:56.
        Failure is an opportunity to learn.

        Comment

        Working...
        X