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  • Knowledge And Application

    A couple of months ago a lady joined the Tai Chi class that I teach

    She seemed very bright

    I've had nurses and PT's and such in my class but never before a real for real Doctor, not only a Doctor but a Doctor that taught in a medical school

    I went from being impressed by this ladies intelligence to also being a little intimidated

    Teaching a Doctor about how to move the body, yeah, okay

    As we have gone forward having her in the class has been valuable, given that I am forever the student whether teaching or not it doesn't bother my ego in the slightest to ask her questions

    The above said

    This lady has the same problems with Tai Chi as everyone else

    Tai Chi can be described as "moving postures", the postures themselves aren't difficult but moving from posture to posture is difficult

    She has the knowledge of how the body moves but making her body perform the movements is frustrating for her, as it is for everyone

    There is another lady, she is kind of our superstar, for about 2 seconds she was my student, she has gone farther faster than anyone I have seen

    She is educated and has a quick mind but I don't know if she could tell you the difference in tendon and a ligament

    What she was, was a dancer, she knows how the body moves


    Just things I've noticed and thought I would pass it along
    Last edited by ricco; 07-18-2019, 18:14.
    "I suppose it's tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail...." ~Abraham Maslow~

    "Skill makes you harder to kill" ~ Unknown

  • #2
    Just FYI, tendons attach muscles to bone, while ligaments attach bones to each other.

    And yes; knowing anatomy can be helpful, but knowing how to move is too.
    Taceant colloquia. Effugiat risus. Hic locus est ubi mors gaudet succurrere vitae.
    The Pale Horse available on Amazon for your digital reader.
    I don't know why I'm better with revolvers, keat so please stop asking.

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    • #3
      About my third or fourth CCH class, there were something like 14 people attending, all but two were lawyers. No pressure at all during the Legal Issues segment (said facetiously). It was interesting looking at statutes from three different points of view---an old cop's experience, several attorneys' viewpoints, and what is written in black and white. They helped me a lot, and no fistfights occurred. There were some lawyer jokes, and some cop-n-doughnut jokes, and everybody stayed friendly.
      Another interesting issue was trying to figure out which attorneys were pro-2A and which were otherwise. Ace2
      Sometimes the term 'Idiot' is a description and not an insult.

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      • #4
        A friend and lawyer likes Lawyer Jokes. His favorte...

        How many lawyers does it take to grease a combine?


        Only one, but if small it might need 2 or 3.
        The people think the Constitution protects their rights; But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.
        If your religion says suicide and murder are wrong; Aren't you doing both if you are not prepared to defend your life and the lives of others?
        I am not a lawyer, but I have personal opinions.

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        • #5
          When I was guiding I had 2 brain surgeons, attorneys, doctors, therapists, LEO, psychiatrists, and so on in various classes. It was always exciting knowing I was going to he able to put the curriculum to the test. It passed the litmus test and they appreciated the deeper dive into the whys. Why matters. Simply playing monkey see monkey do is not good enough for those legitimately interested in evolving as defensive shooters. To me the legal, when can I stuff, isn't worth much of anything. Use common sense and avoid playing dip**** white knight and you'll be gtg. Chances are there won't be any question about it. Talking law is a lot easier and cleaner but...

          I'd better add... Of course it is a good idea to understand the law.
          Last edited by mjkeat; 07-19-2019, 16:13.
          Failure is an opportunity to learn.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mjkeat View Post
            When I was guiding I had 2 brain surgeons, attorneys, doctors, therapists, LEO, psychiatrists, and so on in various classes. It was always exciting knowing I was going to he able to put the curriculum to the test. It passed the litmus test and they appreciated the deeper dive into the whys. Why matters. Simply playing monkey see monkey do is not good enough for those legitimately interested in evolving as defensive shooters. To me the legal, when can I stuff, isn't worth much of anything. Use common sense and avoid playing dip**** white knight and you'll be gtg. Chances are there won't be any question about it. Talking law is a lot easier and cleaner but...

            I'd better add... Of course it is a good idea to understand the law.
            The Doctor I mentioned in my post is at this point

            She is starting to ask questions, I like that, it makes for a more interesting class



            "I suppose it's tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail...." ~Abraham Maslow~

            "Skill makes you harder to kill" ~ Unknown

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ricco View Post

              The Doctor I mentioned in my post is at this point

              She is starting to ask questions, I like that, it makes for a more interesting class


              It absolutely does. Nothing worse for an educator who actually cares to have a group that doesn't interact.
              Failure is an opportunity to learn.

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